Multimedia

When Iraqis Come Home

This video is part of a multimedia story, Hard Choices, that looks into the fate of Iraqi Christians going back to their homes in Northern Iraq, following the liberation of their hometowns from ISIS in 2016.

Love Against All Odds

This video is part of a multimedia story, Hospitality and Hardships, that tells stories of Syrian and Iraqi refugees struggling to lead a decent life in the city of Zahle in Lebanon.

A Day on a Mobile Clinic for Iraqi Refugees

This video is part of a multimedia story, Health on Wheels, that reports on a mobile clinic that tours villages in Kurdish villages to offer medical services to refugees from Iraqi towns under occupation by ISIS.

In Limbo in Lebanon: Iraqi Refugees Starting Over

This video is part of a multimedia story, In Limbo in Lebanon, that tells stories of Iraqi refugees struggling to stay afloat in Lebanon.

Waiting for a “Divine Intervention”

This video is part of a multimedia story, Lebanon on the Brink, that looks into the rampant poverty in Lebanon in 2015 as the influx of Syrian refugees increases and the Lebanese government fails to take action.

Syria Threatens Lebanon’s Fragile Peace

GPscreenshot

A precarious calm marks Ramadan in Bab-el-Tabene, a poor Lebanese neighborhood just 20 miles from the Syrian border. But the scars of war are everywhere. Battles between Sunnis and nearby Alawites have become a grim routine over the last four years.

Hidden Clinic: Where Wounded Syrian Rebels Recover

All three are from Homs. All three are in limbo. Their journeys were marked by perilous delays and near-escapes. Undeterred by their injuries, they are waiting to recover in order to go back and start fighting again.

Looking for a Face 


A Greek artist with low-vision makes drawings of landscapes and still lifes. In New York, Fotis Flevotomos finds inspiration to draw his first portrait in years. An iPad drawing application helps him deal with a blurry eyesight and a difficulty in perceiving depth.

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Working to Save a Piece of Lebanese History

Arab American Women Seek to Empower Community

At the Mosque
At the Mosque

Meher Mohsin, 21, and Lalli Arshad, 19, two volunteers in a voter registration campaign, in front of a Mosque in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, trying to convince Mohamad Jamal al-Din, 57, an Egyptian American businessman, to vote in the upcoming November elections.

Brochure
Brochure

The voter registration campaign aims at empowering and mobilizing the Arab American community, which is traditionally wary of participating in political life.

At a Fair
At a Fair

Nora Abu Shaban, 20, a volunteer, solicits people to become active voters at the Muslim Day Parade in midtown Manhattan on Sunday, September 23, a day when Muslims in New York celebrate their cultures and diversity.

At the Office
At the Office

At the Arab American Association office in Bay Ridge, Aber Kawas, 21, an International Studies university student, trains volunteers on how to approach community members and raise their awareness about the importance of voting.

At a meeting
At a meeting

Aber Kawas, 21, organizer of the voter registration campaign, tells a group of volunteers about the history of voting within the Arab American community.

During the Muslim Day Parade
During the Muslim Day Parade

Rabia AhsinT, 21, and Nazia Rahmen, 23, tell a group of Arab and Muslim American women that voting would make politicians listen to the needs of the community and stop civil rights abuses and racial profiling.

Logo
Logo

Yalla Vote, or Let’s Vote, is a national campaign program launched by the Arab American Institute in 1998. It has been adopted by many Arab communities across the country to run voter registration drives, organize town hall meetings and coordinate “get out the vote” efforts.

Watching the Presidential Debate
Watching the Presidential Debate

Aber Kawas, 21, tweets about the presidential debate with other Arab and Muslim Americans at New York University on October 3, 2012.

Since June, they have been addressing hundreds of people at fairs, rallies and on the streets in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, or any other neighborhood where large numbers of Arab Americans can be found. The mission of these 20-something young women is to register members of the community to vote in the upcoming presidential and legislative elections.

Eleven years after the Sept. 11 attacks, young Arab American activists feel that they need to take a more active role in U.S. political life in order to change policies they regard as discriminatory against them. They believe that voting would make politicians listen to the needs of the community and stop civil rights abuses and racial profiling.

(This photo slideshow was published in October 2012 by Voices of New York)

Arab Americans Speak Out against Discrimination

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